Silvertip Roast with Mustard Crust (Maille Mustard Review)

Many thanks to Diana Castelnuovo-Tedesco of Fraiche PR  for sending me two full size jars of Maille mustard (1 Old Style and 1 Dijon Originale) to sample. All opinions are my own.

I’ve seen Maille mustard in my local supermarket, and chalked it up to one of those ingredients that I’d have in the fridge of my dreams. You know, the type of things that would be in your fridge if you had an unlimited food budget.

PHOTO CREDIT: http://maille.us/

PHOTO CREDIT: http://maille.us/

So when I got an email from Diana asking if I was interested in reviewing these products, I jumped at the chance.  I couldn’t wait to taste really excellent, kosher mustard (both of these are certified OU pareve).

I can say I wasn’t disappointed, and for the first time in my life tasted genuine Dijon mustard. In short, these are excellent products. I tasted a bit of each straight from the jar. The Old Style was a bit spicy, and I was surprised by how smooth the flavor was on my tongue. As soon as I tasted this, I knew exactly what I wanted to do with it.

The Dijon Originale, however, gave me quite a surprise. In the past, I have tasted Grey Poupon, and was not thrilled with the taste – that had been a bit sharp and sour to the point my mouth puckered. Imagine my surprise when I taste this Dijon – bright, full of flavor – and a bit hot.  The heat lingers on the tongue a bit after eating it. After getting over my initial reaction, I found that I kept wanting more.

I will confess that I still need to develop a recipe for this mustard, but just try this- dip boiled red potatoes straight into the jar of Dijon Orignale – and then try to stop eating them. You will find it very hard, if not impossible. I know this from personal experience.

As for the Old Style mustard, I highly recommend using it as a crust on a roast. Be generous – the flavor is distinct but not overpowering, and I can say this was one of the best roasts I have ever made.

Silvertip Roast with Mustard Crust

Ingredients:

2 Silvertip Roasts, about 3 lbs each

2 cups dry red wine

Salt and Pepper for sprinkling

Half a jar of Maille Old Style mustard

2 shallots, sliced

1 pack of crimini mushrooms, cleaned and left whole

1 large Spanish onion, cut in half then cut into slices

To Prepare:

1) Pre-heat oven to 350F.  In a disposable aluminum tray (or doubled up 2 gallon Ziploc bags) pour the red wine over roasts and set in the fridge for a minimum of 20 mins, turning once midway through. While the roasts are marinating, prepare your vegetables and set aside.

2) Remove roasts and discard wine, gently pat dry and sprinkle salt and pepper over top and bottom of roasts.

3) Using a roasting pan with insert, arrange the vegetables on the bottom of the pan. Add the insert, placing the roasts on it. Using a brush (or your fingertips)  liberally apply the mustard all over the roasts, top and bottom. maille1fwp 4) Loosely cover with aluminum foil and roast for 1 hour, uncovering half way through. The temperature at this point will be about 140F, or mid-rare. I would not recommend cooking this style of roast much past mid rare to meduim (150F).

5) Leave roasts to cool at room temperature at least one hour, or until it is barely warm when touched. Slice on a diagonal, and serve with the roasted mushrooms and onions from the bottom of the pan.

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For more information on these specific varieties of mustard, as well as Maille’s other products, please visit their website: http://maille.us/

KOL Foods: A Series on Duck part 1

The ducks used in these recipes are from KOL Foods. (http://kolfoods.com/) I received no other compensation – all opinions are my own.

Nearly a year ago, I was given my first chance to taste and review KOL Foods poultry. I wrote a series of posts back then regarding my experience and opinions on the product (http://foodwordsphotos.com/kol-foods-a-revolution-in-kosher-meat/  and http://foodwordsphotos.com/kol-foods-a-revolution-in-kosher-meat-part-2-review-and-giveaway/). So when I was given this second opportunity to review their duck, I didn’t hesitate to take KOL Foods up on their generous offer.

I was requested to develop recipes for the following: a whole roasted duck, a recipe using the bones to make stock, and a recipe using the leftover meat and stock.  This assignment was right up my street – I am an advocate of using every part of an ingredient as possible. One tiny problem: I’ve never cooked duck before.  But it couldn’t be that difficult, could it?

After asking about, I was seriously beginning to wonder if for the first time in my blogging career I’d bitten off more than I could chew. But the ducks were on their way, I already said I’d do it, and that was that. Enter my pal Simone. For traditional French or Middle Eastern cuisine, I have no better resource. The ideas and recipes I get from her are simply elegant, and incredibly easy to execute.

Duck is delicious when cooked to mid- rare and treated very simply.  Thanks goes to Simone for the majority of this concept and recipe.  The following recipe is for 2 ducks, about 4 lbs each. Add a starch and a vegetable, and you have a fantastic meal for a family.

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Recipe for Roasted Duck

2 4lb KOL Foods ducks

1 bottle of red wine

1 16 oz bottle of Pom Cherry Juice

Salt and Pepper to season

Meat thermometer

Take two 2 gallon Ziploc bags and put them inside each other to form one bag (to make it extra strong) Inside the Ziploc, place your ducks one on top of the other, then add your wine and juice. Lay on its side inside a deep pan, and leave marinate in the liquids overnight, turning once or twice.

The next day, preheat your oven to 400F. Remove ducks from Ziplocs, discarding the liquid. Place ducks breast side down on the rack of a roasting tray (or two trays, if they don’t both fit one one) and remove neck from cavity, setting alongside the ducks on the roasting rack. Using a scant handful of salt and pepper, season your ducks inside and out and tie the legs together and the ends with kitchen twine.

Roast in oven for 1 hr at 400F – about 35 mins in, flip duck over so breast side is up. After one hour, use a meat thermometer to determine temperature. When plunged into the thickest part of the breast, it should be a minimum of 150F. I would not recommend cooking higher than this temperature – as the duck rests it cooks a bit more.

Leave duck rest for about an hour and 15 mins before cutting, then cut lengthwise to serve. Each side can then be cut down into wing, breast and leg pieces.

For my family, I chose to serve the duck with herb-roasted baby potatoes and grilled endive – recipe will be in a future blogpost.

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Product Review: Voilà! Hallah Part 1

Many Thanks to Leah Hadad of Voila!Hallah (Tribes a Dozen)  for the product used in this review. All opinions are my own – the only compensation received was a case of Voila!Hallah for testing.

Allow me to confess a few things before we begin.

Number one: I don’t bake. OK, there is an occasional recipe for a cookie (same recipe, different variations) or a cake (same concept) on my blog, but I really don’t bake. Years ago, yeast and I had a major disagreement and it won.  I haven’t used yeast again til I picked up a box of Voilà! Hallah.

Number two: If it is a mix, and it is in a box, I am instantly skeptical.  Call me a snob, but I like my food as fresh as possible, and as close to homemade as I can get it.  I am a no-sell-ever for boxed mixes of anything.

Number three: If you can combine Number One and Number Two, you will see I was coming into this ready to dislike it. On principal, I don’t ask anyone about a product I am going to review (I like forming my own opinions) so I come into whatever I am testing blind.

I can say that after the second time I tried it, all objections went out the window. I say the second time because I messed up the first time (I didn’t mix it long enough or oil the bowl or my hands and the dough stuck – that’s user error for you- but it still made a great product. Keep reading.)  The second time, I had DH read me the directions and the times, and it came out exactly as the box said it would.

So what do you get from one perfectly made box of Voilà! Hallah? You get one medium challah that reminds me very much of the challah I made in cooking school: not egg and not water, but one that is very light with a delicious crumb. Perfect for Shabbos, and excellent for Sunday french toast. I sent some to my across-the-hall neighbor (a real hasidic lady who uses a recipe from her great-grandmother and an ardent egg challah lover) and her precise words: ” Scrumptious, not eggy and not water. Closer to water challah, though. I’d totally eat this again.”

I even tested it on my own family – we love water challah. I told my kids we had different challah this week. I can say that all my kids, as well as DH ate at least 50% more challah over Shabbat than they normally do. We even used it for open sandwiches on Sunday morning. DH wants to know when I am making more.

Will I say it’s perfect? To me, it could have used more flavor ( it was not discernibly sweet or salty) but for someone who is nervous to bake with yeast (that was me!) or who is willing to experiment in terms of flavors (I am!) this is an excellent, reliable way to make challah.  So what happened to the challah dough that I didn’t mix it long enough and didn’t oil the bowl or my hands? A teaspoon of oil on my hands, and an extra few minutes to rise took care of most of the stickiness. I decided to make that my ‘tester’ and added dried parsley, thyme, rubbed sage and salt. I also added some finely chopped garlic to the top. First, let’s see how to make the Voilà! Hallah :

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Then the finished product:

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The bottom line is the following – is this a product I would recommend to others? I would recommend this to friends of mine who are nervous to make challah (I know so many people are afraid to try because they will either mess up or get a product that doesn’t taste good -if I can’t mess this up, I don’t believe anyone can!)

I would ask you to refer back here in a few week for the second part of the review. I have several boxes of Voilà! Hallah left over and I intend to try different flavor combinations, as well as see what else I can possibly make from this unique product. Stay tuned!