Provencal Tomato Rice Soup with Red Snapper

The Inspiration: http://frenchfood.about.com/od/soupsandstews/r/tomatorice.htm

Every week, at least once, I get an email from the lovely people at www.frenchfood.about.com. Usually when things are quiet at work, I take 10 minutes or so to look the email over. I take the chance to find recipes I want to try later, and recipes I mentally “kosher” (rework by swapping out non-kosher ingredients for kosher ones – I love the challenge!)  Then there are the recipes that get stuck in my head. Like this one. I told all my co-workers for the last month I was making this.

The Innovation: Add fish to the soup to make it a more complete meal.

I am a huge believer in complete meals. If it’s one-pot, even better, because you get all the goodness and flavor all in one place. Usually meals that are one-pot are rich in  vitamins and nutrients because they are cooked slowly. Because I was uncertain how to proceed with adding fish, I baked it separately and added it in the end. Next time, especially with a lovely, thick fillet of snapper, I will slice the fillet in pieces and add when I add the rice. If you stay with the recipe in these quantities, I believe a fillet of snapper is more than enough. I stayed true to the recipe (I always stay true to a recipe the first time, after that no promises!) except I couldn’t get dried fennel seed so I used fresh. I also doubled the amount of vegetables and added a extra 1/2 C of vegetable stock.

My Interpretation: It was a fantastic soup that my entire family (yes, everyone!) enjoyed. It was loaded with delicious vegetables, was very filling and had amazing flavor. The snapper added a rich heartiness to the soup that makes it suitable as a light main course (which was my intention) and the only difference I would make is that I would swap out the dried thyme for fresh.

A bright, vibrant soup that is filling enough to be a main course. Delicious piping hot, and suprisingly good at room temperature or even a bit cooler.

A bright, vibrant soup that is filling enough to be a main course. Delicious piping hot, and surprisingly good at room temperature or even a bit cooler.