Pot Roast

It has been so cold lately! I’m talking flannel pajama, hot water bottle, three- pair- of -socks cold. On nights like that, I like to make a stew like this. It’s simple, hearty and warms the body as it fills the belly. This preparation is very similar to a pot au feu – the biggest difference is the presentation. I serve this as a one course meal- broth, meat and veggies all together in one bowl. Pot au feu is served as two separate courses – the broth is served as a starter, and the meat and veggies are served as the main, along with some boiled potatoes, mustard, and other accompaniments.

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I plan on serving this for one of my Purim seudot as well – we make two, one around 11 in the morning and one around 4pm- because it is that simple and delicious. You might notice the lack of onions and garlic in this recipe- it is deliberate. To boost the flavor but stay away from onions and garlic, I cooked the shallot til very brown, and added a large parsnip and a turnip. All this gives the stew a fresh sharpness so I don’t miss the onions and garlic!

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Ingredients:

1 piece of chuck or pot roast, between 2 to 3lbs

1/2 of a 750ml bottle of dry red wine

1/3 C orange juice

1 sleeve celery, cleaned and chopped

1 large parsnip. peeled and sliced

1 turnip, peeled and sliced

2 lg carrots, peeled and sliced

1 shallot, sliced thin

1 large handful fresh parsley (leaves only, minced)

Salt and pepper to taste

To prepare:

1) Add salt and pepper to the roast on both sides. Sear on both sides, about 8 mins per side. Remove from pot and set aside

2) Lower flame, then add the shallots and celery, cooking until the shallots start to get very brown

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3) Add the carrots and parsnip,the red wine and orange juice. Keep flame at a mid-low setting and let the vegetables sweat, til you have a very good broth started.

4) Add the meat, and top with the parsley and turnip. Add a small amount of salt and pepper, and water til everything is just barely covered.

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5) Cook for about 1 and a half hours on low, or until the meat is fork tender.